FAMILY LET'S TALK

Squeezing the Toothpaste from the Middle – A Lesson in Tolerance

Written by Lindsay Pearson

Co-habitation can be trying at the best of times. Whether we admit to it or not, most of us are guilty of repeatedly practising irritating rituals which make a partner question not only their own mental stability, but their partners as well. You know what I’m talking about – the all too common daily annoyances that mock, taunt, and test us while eagerly awaiting a reaction to the opportunity presented. Opportunity? You may be wondering how finding yet another empty toilet paper roll in the bathroom, or nearly empty milk carton in the fridge, is an opportunity. Moments like these give us a chance to display the virtues which, perhaps, led you to cohabitate in the first place: patience, magnanimity, endurance. So it makes sense that tolerability would be a virtue to strive for as well, right? Permitting a little bit of leeway from what might be considered a “standard” can lighten the mood in any home and leave you with more energy to tackle the bigger, more important issues that are bound to surface. Of course, the pendulum swings both ways so as you attempt tolerability as a team; I leave you with this: 
“In the practice of tolerance, one’s enemy is the best teacher” (Dalai Lama).

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About the author

Lindsay Pearson

Lindsay worked as an Audiometrician and Operational Trainer in Victoria’s Healthcare industry since 2002. This highly rewarding career allowed her to work primarily with the senior community in assisting those with hearing disabilities. Lindsay eventually accepted a position as a trainer which also came with the opportunity to travel throughout Canada. After much self-reflection and a change in her priorities, Lindsay made the decision to follow one of her other passions, writing. Now a full time student, she is working towards an Associate Degree with a focus in Creative Writing. Her first publication was a chap book, and she enjoys playing in the realm of both poetry and prose.